Hometown Boxers Favored On Card This Weekend At Ford Performing Arts Center

Hometown Boxers Favored On Card This Weekend At Ford Performing Arts Center

The Dearborn Civic Center also known as the Ford Community & Performing Arts Center in Dearborn, Michigan at 15801 Michigan Ave will be hosting an excellent night of professional boxing this Saturday, December 7th with action starting at 8 PM. Topbreed Management along with Second 2 None Promotions’ fight card, The Best of Tomorrow 9 tentatively features 8 stand out, competitive matchups put together by matchmakers, Ira Kendrick and Kenny Moore.

(more…)

Barnes Return A Success – Sort Of

by Lindy Lindell

     October 11, 2019, DeCarlos Convention Center, Warren, MI.  Inactive for 15 months, super-middleweight Anthony Barnes, supported by Kara Ro in his corner, returned with a credible and un clear-cut six-round split decision duke over Kenneth Council.  It was clear-cut, though one judge had him losing, not unreasonable, but the margin of that score clearly made it into the “ridiculous” category.

(more…)

NHL Rule Change

9/15/18 By Andrew Walsh

One of the main complaints about the current state of the NHL is the fact that there is not enough scoring in today’s game. Going back 50 years as a frame of reference, the Stanley Cup champion in 1967 was the Montreal Canadiens. That year the Hart Trophy (given to the league’s most valuable player) winner was Stan Mikita, who played center and right wing. Games in the past used to routinely end with six goals being scored by the winning team. This is not the case in the NHL today. How should the league begin to fix this problem with a lack of scoring?(more…)

Detroit History Through the Lens of Boxing, Part II

By Lindy Lindell, Author and Exclusive Boxing Commentator for GreeningDetroit.com Sports

Almost three years ago in writing Part I of “Detroit History Through the Lens of Boxing,” for greeningdetroit.com, I alluded to two stories that are generally unknown to the history of Detroit through the ever-narrowing lens of boxing. Those two stories involve a murder of a black boxing trainer by a white patrolman in 1963 (a scenario that pulls in but does not directly involve a very young Emanuel Steward, and another strange (I’m going to call it a non-happening) in which Muhammad Ali was denied to fight in Motown against heavyweight champion Joe Frazier in 1970, but did fight in Frazier in New York in what has become regarded as the Fight of the Century in 1971.(more…)

O’Quinn, Bonas Impressive in Local Ring Returns

By Lindy Lindell, Author and Exclusive Boxing Commentator for GreeningDetroit.com Sports

For Detroit bantamweight Jarico O’Quinn, it had been a half-year of frustrating inactivity and two cancelled fights before finally getting into the ring last night and getting some much-needed work against a tough, meaningful opponent, Nick Otieno, 31-13, Kenya, who steadily moved forward and made O’Quinn, 8-0-1, work for his six-round win last night at Warren, Michigan’s DeCarlo’s Banquet and Convention Center

(more…)

O’Quinn Takes First Main Go in Stride

A report from the weigh-in by Lindy Lindell, Author and Exclusive Boxing Commentator, GreeningDetroit.com Sports

Detroit bantamweight Jarico O’Quinn, 7-0-1, will make his maiden main-event go Friday night at Warren, Michigan’s DeCarlo’s Center, a Second to None Promotion, against a very experienced Nick Otieno, a 43-fight vet who has 31 wins and who has never been stopped.  O’Quinn, inactive since August (two fights have fallen out on him), relishes the action, but sees no big handicap for in fighting a boxer with so much pro experience.  O’Quinn had been hoping to fight eight rounders by now, but all will presumably be well if Otieno shows up.  He hadn’ t shown at the weigh-in by seven o’clock, an hour-and-a-half after the designated time for the weigh-in.  

(more…)

College Football Recap

All of the top teams in college football won their games against inferior competition today, making for a pretty boring Saturday.  The biggest threat for an upset going into the weekend was said to be Wisconsin, who hosted a banged up Michigan team in Madison.  This was probably wishful thinking as Michigan was starting freshman Brandon Peters.

This did not last long as Peters was hit in the third quarter and landed on his left side.  He was carted off the field and taken into the locker room in a wheelchair.  Michigan’s head coach Jim Harbaugh said that Peters was being tested for a head injury.  Peters was replaced by John O’Korn and Michigan’s offense was unable to do anything.  Wisconsin won the game 24-10.

Oklahoma’s game against Kansas went much smoother than that, at least that is what the final score would indicate.  However, the controversial quarterback for the Sooners, after throwing his third touchdown pass of the game, made an inappropriate gesture towards the Kansas sideline.

https://twitter.com/ScottBellDMN/status/932022273791418369

(Video courtesy: @ScottBellDMN)

Just A City Boy, Born And Raised In Holland Michigan

Just a city boy, born and raised in south Detroit.  He took the midnight train goin’ anywhere.  That refrain from Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin’” has been heard at the end of Detroit Red Wings games more often than would have been expected before the season started.

One of the highlights one quarter of the way through the Red Wings season, if you like old-time hockey (like Eddie Shore), was a fight between the benches at Little Caeser’s Arena with the Calgary Flames.  The fight started when Luke Witkowski got into it with the Flames forward Brett Kulak.  Witkowski was sent to the penalty box for a fighting major, two ten minute misconducts and a game misconduct.  End of story, right?  Not so fast.

After a conveniently timed commercial break, the broadcast came back to Witkowski being sent to the dressing room because there were only approximately six minutes left in the game that would ultimately end with the Red Wings winning 8-2.  As he was making his way to the locker room, the Flames’ Matthew Tkachuk gave Witkowski what one might describe as a love tap on the back of the leg.  Witkowski took exception to this and the two teams began your garden variety hockey fight.

I call this a garden variety hockey fight because as a young hockey fan, I sat in amazement as I watched the same Detroit Red Wings and Colorado Avalanche have a rivalry that will remain unmatched in my mind during the 1990s.  This rivalry had everything, two evenly matched hockey teams, bitter hatred, two coaches yelling at each other between the benches, and even a goalie fight!

Perhaps the new building which some fans have christened the Dough Joe as an homage to the Joe Louis Arena will be the place where such memories will be matched, but these kinds of moments need to be made over several years.  Some will say a rivalry such as the one between the Wings and Avalanche will never be duplicated because of the salary cap that has since been introduced to hockey and the player movement that comes along with it.

The Astros are Houston Strong

The Houston Astros won their first World Series title last week over the Los Angeles Dodgers.  Jose Altuve, Josh Springer, and the late season acquisition of Detroit Tigers pitcher Justin Verlander were the main catalysts for this championship run.  Another was the shared sense of strength the Astros felt after seeing what the city of Houston went through in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.  The hashtag Houston Strong was trending on all social media platforms throughout the playoffs and now the Astros social media accounts have been sharing that they have earned history.  Not bad for a team that in 2013 drew a 0.0 Nielsen rating for a regular season game.  That did not stop Sports Illustrated’s Ben Reiter from writing a story in 2014 predicting that the team would win the World Series in 2017, a story that would be placed on the cover of the magazine.  I’m reminded of the Seinfeld episode where Elaine creates the “Urban Sombrero” and puts it on the cover of the latest issue of the J. Peterman catalog.  Lucky for Reiter that the Astros had a vision and stuck to their plan and are now celebrating their first ever World Series title.

Pontiac Silverdome

How is your Sunday morning going? Good? I’d wager a guess and say it’s probably started better than the Sunday morning for the fine folks at the Detroit-based Adamo Group.

The Adamo Group is the demolition company that was charged with turning the Pontiac Silverdome into just a memory this morning.  Some might say that a failure to bring down the stadium that was once home of the only team in NFL history to complete a season without a single win is the perfect metaphor.  There must be some sort of cosmic force at play that won’t let anything go right at 1200 Featherstone Road.  How else would you explain the fact that the franchise that drafted both Calvin Johnson and Barry Sanders, two of the most talented football players at their respective positions, has only won one playoff game in the last 59 years!

There hasn’t been an NFL stadium implosion related debacle since that time the Weather Channel set up a camera to film the demolition of the Georgia Dome, the former home of the Atlanta Falcons.

On the positive, the fact that the Silverdome is still standing shows just how sturdy the former home of both the Lions and Pistons is.  It is doubtful that any other sports arena, built in the past or even more recently, would be able to withstand such an explosive force.

Detroit History Through the Lens of Boxing

by Lindy Lindell

It’s gone now: boxing in Detroit has been so marginalized and fractured into bits that it’s hard to imagine that the sport used to be the second most important in terms of fan interest in America.

But there was a time in Detroit when boxing was a decided, living phenomena in the lineaments of Detroit city life. Natives of a certain age will tell you that their father or uncle was a Detroit city Golden Gloves participant. Now, only the most diehard boxing buff could tell you the name of the heavyweight champion. (There are actually three heavyweight champions recognized by four sanctioning bodies—and this “confusion” is part of boxing’s problem).(more…)

Proudly Powered By:
World Web Wizards